Archive for October 2011

Question : What is a modular power supply?

October 30, 2011

Answer:
Simply put, a modular power supply has ports instead of wires.

A modular power supply doesn’t have wires soldered to it like a non modular power supply. It has ports instead. With the modular power supply comes the power cable connections for all of it’s possible ports. The idea is to clean up the inside of the PC, by not having all those wires unnecessarily hanging about. So you only connect the device you will be using to the port on the power supply. For example, instead of having 6 sata power wires hanging out the power supply when you are only using 2, you can clear 4 of those wires with a modular power supply and decrease the clutter inside. That’s it’s point.

Question: Can I fit DDR3 RAM in a DDR2 slot on my older motherboard?

October 30, 2011

Answer:
No.

The key card notch is physically different. Therefore you won’t be able to fit it in the slot.

If your motherboard is designed for DDR2 RAM, it would be wise to get DDR2 RAM for it. If you have DDR3 RAM available to you, you may want to look into getting a motherboard that supports it.

This applies to desktops as well as laptops/notebooks/portables(apple)

Question : Would it be best to turn off the SSID when configuring a wireless router?

October 30, 2011

Answer:
No.
It doesn’t do anything in reality for those who are looking for networks. You can easily spot wifi networks and IDs with any radar program available today. Turning off the SSID isn’t really going to matter. Mac Filtering isn’t really going to matter, because you can spoof Mac address’s today very easily.

What you should try to do, is create layers and make things more complex and therefor more time consuming. That sounds like a joke, but it’s seriously the only thing you can do. For example, turn off the SSID, turn mac filtering on, create a VPN with secure handshaking and limit the range of the router itself.

These things by themselves are basically pointless. But if you have layers, it’s more time consuming to those who want to break into your system. Think aboiut it like this, a car alarm is probably pointless on it’s own. It’s just annoying and most people ignore it anyways. However, a car alarm with a low jack and a steering wheel lock and an engine disabler. Now it’s gonna be real tricky and time consuming to get into that car. Now you step back and wonder if it’s worth the effort. That’s all.

Or if you like, another example would be the movie Entrapment. Having all those layers is like having those invisible laser beams of security. It’s very complex and time consuming to get to the jewel. So it has to be worth getting the jewel to go through all that madness.

Question : Can I use an AGP 8x video card in a computer that only has an older AGP slot on it?

October 26, 2011

Answer:
http://www.playtool.com/pages/agpcompat/agp.html

Question : What’s the difference between an active heatsink and a passive one?

October 26, 2011

Answer:
An active heat sink has a fan attached to it, to actively pull heat away from the heat sink and chip that lies underneath it.

A passive heat sink is just a heat sink, a piece of flat metal with fins on top that directs heat away from the chip set it is installed on.

An example of an active heat sink would be the heat sinks installed on top of today’s processors, Intel and AMD. They are big heat sinks with fans attached to them.

Another example would be a video card. Today’s modern video cards GPUs (Graphic Processor Unit) have heat sinks and fans installed on them because of their required workload.

An example of a passive heat sink would be a north bridge or math co processor chip set heat sink. These don’t tend to have fans on top of them because their work load doesn’t require it (yet).